Teenage Politicians on Delmar Ballots - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Teenage Politicians on Delmar Ballots

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(Photo: Delmar DustPan) (Photo: Delmar DustPan)

DELMAR, Del.- We've seen teenage politicians in Oklahoma, Michigan and Rhode Island. But not on Delmarva, and that could change. Political figures, as young as 18-years-old, could call the shots. 

Jamell Haroman, of Delmar, Del., said make room for his daughter, who is 11-years-old and a few years from eligibility.

"Oh yeah go for it, go for it," Haroman said he would say to cheer on his child if she choose to run for office. "She might be the next president."

People at the age of 18, 19 and 20 can run for office, according to the charter for the town of Delmar, Del.

"I think with the right background and the right resources, I think they are capable," said Kandice Hancock of Delmar.

Apparently, so does the mayor and city council members. Town officials met last night at the town hall to review a proposal to increase the age requirement for local politicians-- from 18 to 21. But the bill didn't receive enough support and failed in the council.

"When you are 18, you are considered an adult," Haroman said. " So, I think you should be allowed to run."

At the age of 18, you could drive a car, vote and buy your own cigarettes, but some people in Delmar say you are not old enough to run for office.

"I think there are a lot of experiences between 18 and 21, and beyond that, you have to experience before you can lead," said local Delmar businessman Steve Spack.

Lurrell Snead, of Delmar, agrees and even has his own age requirement for local politicians.

"I think they should at least be 22, 23, 24," said Snead.

Keeping teenagers off the ballots is a debate the town manager says may come up again. But for now, teenagers could jump on the campaign trail and run for office.

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