Texting While Driving Moved to Primary Offense - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Texting While Driving Moved to Primary Offense

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(Photo: WBOC) (Photo: WBOC)

CAMBRIDGE, Md.- Smart phones can help you with almost everything, but their advanced hands-free technology could entice some Maryland drivers to use their voice to text while driving.

The no texting while driving law was just bumped up from a second offense to a primary offense in Maryland.

"I think that eliminating the ability to distract drivers in an important part of safe driving," said Steve Rideout of Cambridge.

While it seems safer to use your voice, a study at Texas A&M says it is just as dangerous as using your hands to text. Nearly 152,000 people in Maryland from 2007-2011 were injured in distracted driving-related crashes.

Buel Young with the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration said texting, talking on the phone, or changing the radio distracts drivers and has the potential to be dangerous.

Vera Cusick of Linkwood said she has texted behind the wheel before and has regretted it.

"I don't think we should text and drive regardless, I have done it in the past and it was a big mistake," Cusick said.  

But some believe it will be hard for police to crack down on voice texting.

"There is no way to actually tell if they are actually doing something on their phone or not," said Kevin McFarlane of Cambridge.

The risk of getting caught or causing an accident may not be worth the reward.

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