Del. Drinking Water Deemed Safe Despite EPA Study - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Del. Drinking Water Deemed Safe Despite EPA Study

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DOVER, Del. - The nation's drinking water systems are deteriorating, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. But workers in Delaware are trying to make sure drinking water there stays clean and free from toxins.

Ed Hallock with Delaware's Office of Drinking Water says one of the issues with water systems is that pipes are underground.  

"Water is not free. When you put infrastructure in the ground you have to maintain it, repair it, replace it, eventually," said  Hallock.
     
Hallock said his office regulates about 500 public water systems in Delaware.  

According to a new assessment by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, more than $70 billion is needed to prevent contamination of about 73,000 water systems across the country.

The EPA states the most significant expense should go to replacing aging pipes, many of which are between 50- and 100-years-old.

Despite the EPA's report, Hallock said Delaware's drinking water is safe.

Sharon Duca, director for the city of Dover Public Works department, said the water in Dover is also safe.
 
"We can't assume that the infrastructure will stay in excellent condition forever. It's just like your automobile. You need to put regular maintenance in your vehicle and from time to time you have to replace it," said Sharon Duca, Director for the City of Dover Public Works Department.
     
Duca said that between $1 million and $2 million are invested in the system every year.

"If your water quality is good to begin with it's not going to deteriorate the pipes quite as badly. If you have poor water quality it can erode the pipes or corrode the pipes more quickly," said Hallock.
     
It's that good water quality both Hallock and Duca say they want to keep.

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