Sports injuries can damage kidneys - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Sports injuries can damage kidneys

© Brand X Pictures / Thinkstock © Brand X Pictures / Thinkstock
  • HealthMore>>

  • The 'Hobby Lobby ruling' and what it means for U.S. health care

    The 'Hobby Lobby ruling' and what it means for U.S. health care

    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on contraception coverage -- as mandated under the Affordable Care Act -- could lead to a legal quagmire that might allow companies to deny insurance coverage for any medical practice that violates their religious principles.More
    The U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on contraception coverage -- as mandated under the Affordable Care Act -- could lead to a legal quagmire that might allow companies to deny insurance coverage for any medical practice that violates their religious principles.More
  • Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Diet changes can alter gut bacteria

    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.More
    Dietary changes can dramatically alter the balance of bacteria in the gut on a daily basis, according to a new study.More
  • Lift U.S. ban on blood donations by gay men

    Lift U.S. ban on blood donations by gay men

    The United States should repeal a 30-year policy that bans blood donations from gay and bisexual men, according to a team of medical and legal experts writing this week in the Journal of the American Medical...More
    The United States should repeal a 30-year policy that bans blood donations from gay and bisexual men, according to a team of medical and legal experts writing this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association.More

MONDAY, May 19, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A single blow to the belly or side while playing a sport can result in a significant kidney injury, a new study shows.

The researchers advised that doctors should consider the possibility of serious kidney injuries when evaluating patients with sports injuries.

"While it is common to suspect renal injury following a car accident, this type of injury isn't always obvious in patients with sports-related trauma," Dr. Jack McAninch, former president of the American Urological Association (AUA) and professor of urology at the University of California, San Francisco, said in an AUA news release.

"This study clearly shows that high-grade renal trauma can result if an individual receives a solitary blow to their abdomen or side when taking part in sports-related activities such as skiing, snowboarding or cycling," he said.

In conducting the study, researchers from the University of Utah and Intermountain Medical Center in Murray, Utah, examined information on patients with kidney trauma treated between January 2005 and January 2011. They analyzed the patients' records and graded the severity of their injuries.

The researchers found that 30 percent of the injuries examined were sustained during a sporting event. They noted that these injuries involved men more often than women.

Severe sports-related injuries typically resulted from just one blow to the belly or the side, the study showed.

Certain sports accounted for most of these kidney injuries, including:

    Cycling
    Skiing
    Snowboarding

    The study was to be presented Monday at the American Urological Association's annual meeting in Orlando, Fla. Research presented at meetings should be viewed as preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

    More information

    The Urology Care Foundation provides more information on kidney trauma.

    Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

    *DISCLAIMER*: The information contained in or provided through this site section is intended for general consumer understanding and education only and is not intended to be and is not a substitute for professional advice. Use of this site section and any information contained on or provided through this site section is at your own risk and any information contained on or provided through this site section is provided on an "as is" basis without any representations or warranties.
    Powered by WorldNow

    All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Worldnow and WBOC. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy and Terms of Service