Nemours Survey Analyzes Understanding of Child Concussions - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Nemours Survey Analyzes Understanding of Child Concussions

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WILMINGTON, Del. – A national Nemours KidsHealth.org survey of 500 parents and coaches shows they may not always know when to seek emergency medical attention for their kids regarding concussions.

Nemours says the problem with going back into practice or a game is that kids, rocked by that first hit to the head, are at higher risk for a second, more serious concussion. And the results of that can be more harmful, requiring weeks, and sometimes months, of recovery.

The survey found that almost 40% of sports coaches said they would do something other than take the child out of the game.

“After a suspected concussion from a hit to the head, kids and teens should sit out for the rest of the game or practice, and only return to play once they've gotten an OK from a medical professional,” Kate Cronan, MD, Medical Editor for KidsHealth.org, said.

In the survey, more than half of parents didn't know it was okay to let their child sleep after a hit to the head.

While a child should be watched closely for the first 24 to 48 hours after the injury, it is not necessary to keep the child awake before seeing the doctor, according to Nemours.

Health officials say a child who loses consciousness, has a severe headache, blurred vision, difficulty walking, or can't remember what happened should be evaluated immediately.

Kids are at the most risk if they don't get quick and proper care for a concussion.

For other symptoms such as a mild headache or difficulty concentrating, parents should call the child's doctor for help in deciding what steps to take next.

Below are key findings of the survey:

· Coaches are more aware of the proper return to play rule than non-coaches. 56% of coaches responded that they would follow the proper return to play rule, while 51% of non coaches would follow something other than the recommended rule.

· The Northeast region of the country show a higher awareness of the correct return to play rule compared with the Midwest and West.

· Females caregivers are more likely to “take no chances” after a hit to the head and seek immediate medical attention for their kids versus their male counterparts, who are more likely to “wait and see.”

· 67% of parents report that their kids can still play in organized sports, but they are more cautious due to the impact of the media's coverage of concussions.

· About 50% of parents said they'd be OK with their child getting back in the game without a medical evaluation.

· 88% of parents said they'd go to the ER if their child lost consciousness. But more than half (52%) of parents said they would not get emergency care for blurred vision, a worrisome symptom that may need quick attention.

· About 25% of parents said they would not go to the ER if their child had difficulty walking, another serious sign that may be going overlooked. Instead, parents said they'd do something less, such as call the doctor or even call the doctor in a day or two.

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