Benefits of Exercises - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Benefits of Exercises

What are some of the benefits of exercise?

- Increases strength and stamina for activities of daily living

- Improves cardiovascular health

- Reduces risk of developing Type II Diabetes

- Lowers blood sugar levels

- Aids in weight loss/maintenance of healthy body weight

- Increases the amount of calories you burn at rest (i.e. resting metabolic rate)

- Aids in stress management

- Assists with blood pressure control

- Improves lipid profile

- Makes you feel better about yourself

- Improves flexibility

- Helps reduce your risk of developing osteoporosis

* These are just some of the benefits of exercise. You may have thought of some benefits not listed here.

What are the components of a well-rounded exercise program?

- Warm-up

- Cardiovascular exercise

- Muscular fitness

- Cool-down, including flexibility exercises

Warm-Up

Prior to any bout of exercise, you should always warm-up. A proper warm-up should consist of 10-15 minutes of moderate intensity activity which involves all major muscle groups. While in Phase II Cardiac Rehab., you will most likely do warm-up exercises with your classmates. When you exercise on your own at home, you do not necessarily have to do all of the exercises that we do during the group warm-up in Cardiac Rehab. Even if you just walk or bike slower for the first 10-15 minutes that would be enough. The warm-up is designed to gradually increase your blood pressure and heart rate.

Cardiovascular Exercise

What is cardiovascular exercise?

- aerobic in nature

- uses large muscle groups

- i.e. hiking, swimming, walking, etc.

How often should you engage in cardiovascular exercise?

- 3 x per week initially

- Eventually increase your frequency to include most or all days of the week

How long should you engage in cardiovascular exercise?

- 20-60 mins. of continuous exercise

How hard should cardiovascular exercise be?

- You should try to exercise within your target heart rate (THR)

- You should be able to carry on a conversation during cardiovascular exercise (i.e. "talk test")

- You should feel like you are working between an 11-13 on the RPE scale

Muscular Fitness

What is muscular fitness?

- Exercises which use resistance in the form of either weights, therabands, balls, etc. in order to improve muscular strength and/or endurance

How often should you work on your muscular fitness?

- 2-3 days per week

- Allow 48 hours of rest between bouts of resistance training

How hard should your muscular fitness routine be?

- 1-2 sets of 8-12 repetitions using all the major muscle groups

- Always remember to exhale on exertion when doing resistance training and never hold your breath!

Cool-down

After any bout of exercise, you should always cool-down. A proper cool-down should consist of 10-15 minutes of lower intensity activity, which involves stretching all of the major muscle groups from head to toe. It is important to hold each stretch for 10-30 seconds, not to bounce or use jerky movements during stretching, and to stretch to the point of mild discomfort, not pain! The cool-down period is the time when you should be focusing on improving your flexibility. Also, through cool-down, your blood pressure and heart rate should gradually decrease to within resting values.

Pulse taking

Why is it important for you to know how to take your own pulse?

- in case you do not have a heart monitor handy

- to make sure you are exercising within your target heart rate at home

How do you take your pulse?

- locate your pulse with the tips of your first two fingers. Try the thumb side of your wrist or to the left or right of

your Adam's apple

- after you can feel each separate beat plainly, begin counting the beats

- use the second hand on a watch or clock to count the number of beats you feel for a full minute (60 seconds).

Count as follows: "zero, one, two, three, etc." until 1 minute passes

- after you feel more confident at checking your pulse, just count the number of beats you feel within a 10 second interval. Multiply that number by 6. This will give you your heart rate measured in beats per minute

HEART RATE CONVERSION TABLE

Beats/ 10 seconds

Heart Rate; beats/minute

9

54

10

60

11

66

12

72

13

78

14

84

15

90

16

96

17

102

18

108

19

114

20

120

21

126

22

132

23

138

24

144

25

150

26

156

27

162

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