Deer Mating Season Poses Risks to Drivers - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Deer Mating Season Poses Risks to Drivers

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White-tailed deer graze at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes at dusk, a time when they're likely to be crossing roads. (Photo: WBOC) White-tailed deer graze at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes at dusk, a time when they're likely to be crossing roads. (Photo: WBOC)
A herd of white-tailed deer graze at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, with male bucks waiting to mate with females. (Photo: WBOC) A herd of white-tailed deer graze at Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, with male bucks waiting to mate with females. (Photo: WBOC)
Road caution sign for deer crossing posted yards away from the entrance to Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, where white-tailed deer are known to frequent. (Photo: WBOC) Road caution sign for deer crossing posted yards away from the entrance to Cape Henlopen State Park in Lewes, where white-tailed deer are known to frequent. (Photo: WBOC)

LEWES, Del. – AAA Mid-Atlantic cautions drivers to be wary of deer on dark roads as the animal’s mating season starts in October.

Delaware's Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control says October, November and December is mating season for white tailed deer in Delaware.

Last year, Delaware State Police logged more 1,200 collisions drivers had with deer or other animals. There were also 54 personal injuries related to animal-vehicle crashes in 2014, a 15 percent jump from the previous year.

AAA says deer rut season is the worst period for animal-related car crashes.

A hunter from Milton says it's the male bucks chasing after females that cause problems for drivers.

“During the fall they're after the does,” said John Mead.  “The doe goes across the street, the buck's going to cross the street also. So if you're driving down the road and you see one deer, stay alert because there's two or three more behind it."

A Selbyville mom of three who just moved from Puerto Rico says she's nervous about running into deer.

"I get nervous around sunset and definitely know that the deer are out and to keep an eye out," said Tiffany Bonbright.

For Mead, he says he’s had a few near-misses.

"I have never hit a deer with my car. I know friends that have and I’ve come close but no one I know has been injured," he said.

DNREC says once the first phase of the deer rut end, the second phase is a less intensive mating period.

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