Some Local Farmers Oppose Higher Minimum Wage - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Some Local Farmers Oppose Higher Minimum Wage

Posted: Updated:
Vincent Farms in Laurel, Del. Ray Vincent, the owner, is speaking out against a minimum wage hike bill that passed the Delaware State Senate. (Photo: WBOC) Vincent Farms in Laurel, Del. Ray Vincent, the owner, is speaking out against a minimum wage hike bill that passed the Delaware State Senate. (Photo: WBOC)
Vincent Farms in Laurel, Del. Ray Vincent, the owner, is speaking out against a minimum wage hike bill that passed the Delaware State Senate. (Photo: WBOC) Vincent Farms in Laurel, Del. Ray Vincent, the owner, is speaking out against a minimum wage hike bill that passed the Delaware State Senate. (Photo: WBOC)
The Delaware State Senate in session. The Senate passed a bill that would raise the minimum wage over the course of four years through 2020. (Photo: WBOC) The Delaware State Senate in session. The Senate passed a bill that would raise the minimum wage over the course of four years through 2020. (Photo: WBOC)

LAUREL, Del.- The Delaware Senate passed a bill last week that would increase the state minimum wage gradually through 2020. 

Ray Vincent, the owner of Vincent Farms in Laurel, said that is bad business, because other competitor states have lower minimum wages. According to Vincent, his business employs approximately 250 workers, most of whom are hourly employees.  

"At $8.25, we're at a competitive disadvantage now. By June of 2020, with the $2 increase to ten and a quarter, we won't be able to compete at all," said Vincent.

Sen. Robert Marshall, D-Wilmington West, who is the bill's sponsor, said increasing the minimum wage is about the family and helping them live a better life. 

"Any increase gives a level of confidence and we instill in those who live here and work here and raise families here, who survive and get by day by day on the hourly minimum wage or a little above that they're important, that they have value," he said.

Vincent said that actually ends up hurting the worker. He said he would need to lay off some of his workers.

"A portion of those two hundred fifty folks will be unemployed, or won't be employed here. We will have to change something that we're doing. We will have to find where we can be competitive and work with that instead of doing this, doing so much of the hand labor," said Vincent. 

Once the bill leaves a House committee it can be brought up for a vote. 

If it passes the House it moves to Gov. Jack Markell's desk. He has not said if he would sign it. 

Powered by Frankly

All content © Copyright 2000 - 2017 WBOC. All Rights Reserved. For more information on this site, please read our Privacy Policy, and Terms of Service, and Ad Choices