Maryland Lawmakers Make Opposition to Chesapeake Bay Program's P - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Maryland Lawmakers Make Opposition to Chesapeake Bay Program's Potential Funding Crisis

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CAMBRIDGE, Md. – A biologist with the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science says federal cuts to the EPA, which will drastically impact The Chesapeake Bay Program, will also trickle down to work scientists are able to do.

David Nemazie, chief of staff for the center in Cambridge, says the program, which coordinates and monitors efforts of the six bay watershed states and the District of Columbia in meeting pollution reduction goals, is largely responsible for the improvements the bay has seen.

The Chesapeake Bay has actually been getting better,” Nemazie said.

On Friday the Maryland Senate passed a resolution expressing opposition to federal budget cuts to the Chesapeake Bay Program.
           
The Senate voted 35-10 for the resolution, which now goes to the House.
           
President Donald Trump's budget proposal would eliminate federal funding for the program that coordinates cleanup efforts for the nation's largest estuary.
           
The program, which was formed in 1983, received $73 million in federal funds last year. Trumps 2018 proposal would chop it to $0.

"If the pie gets smaller,” said Nemazie, “it becomes that much more competitive and that much more challenging to get the funding.
           
The resolution is one of several steps the Democrat-controlled legislature has taken this year in response to the Trump administration. The General Assembly also has approved money for the attorney general to hire staff to sue the federal government.

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