Some Delaware Educators Worried Over Cuts to Education - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Some Delaware Educators Worried Over Cuts to Education

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DOVER, Del. -- Gov. John Carney's proposal to cut $37 million from school districts and charter schools has drawn concern and criticism from some educators and homeowners, who believe the plan could

As part of a $4.1 billion operating budget proposed for Fiscal Year 2018, Carney (D) proposed cutting $15 million from operational funding to charter schools and school districts. The plan also calls for reducing $22 million from the Educational Sustainability Fund, which is used by districts to pay for a number of things, like salaries and programs.

Carney has said the cuts are part of a "shared sacrifice" that will be seen in other state agencies and funding to local entities. He said a match tax would allow districts to raise school property taxes without going to referendum.

But Capital School District Superintendent Dan Shelton said there could be blow back for raising taxes without a referendum, even though the school hasn't asked for an operating referendum in more than a decade.

"It's going to be a really tough sell if we just raised property taxes because the state just shifted money down to us. They have to give us relief on referendum. We have to have some sort of way to raise with the cost of living."

Shelton said Capital would lose $786,000 in operational funding and $1.15 million in funding from the ESF, which is used for salaries in the district.

Joe Hartman, a teacher who also is an officer in the Caesar Rodney Education Association, said many educators worry the cuts proposed in the governor's budget could lead to fewer teachers in classrooms.

"We worry that they could mean possibly loss of jobs. We know there's going to be some loss of resources," he said.

Larry Mallery of Dover said he could likely afford the cuts to subsidies for senior citizens on school property tax increases and the hike districts may seek through the match option but doesn't want to see cuts to education.

"Cutting anything from the schools today isn't good," he said. "I mean, there's too many kids with nothing to start with."

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