Dorchester County Documentary Stirring Debate on Climate Change - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Dorchester County Documentary Stirring Debate on Climate Change

Posted: Jun 06, 2018 5:37 PM Updated:

CAMBRIDGE, Md. - The documentary, "High Tide in Dorchester," is making waves.

The film's cinematographer and director, Dave Harp, says, since debuting in March, the film has traveled across the East Coast and the world, spreading a message of accelerated sea level rise and land erosion in Dorchester County due to climate change.

"I'm feeling pretty good about the message and the reception we're getting to our message," Harp said. "And the one thing we wanted to do with this film is get people into the room to have a conversation, bringing all the players together to talk about this."

And there's plenty of conversation - Dorchester County Council Vice President Tom Bradshaw says he saw the film. He argues it isn't climate change, but Mother Nature just doing her job.

"I don't feel the glaciers are melting and the sea level is coming up," Bradshaw said. "Everything runs in cycles. You'll have hot years, cold years, dry years. you'll have huge snowstorms and hardly no snowstorms some winters. Mother Nature is going to do her thing regardless."

Bradshaw adds old farming practices could play into erosion and sea level rise in the county, but it's Mother Nature who ultimately decides whether land stays or breaks off.

But Harp argues, though climate change can't be seen, it's very real.

"They have their point of view and I have my point of view," Harp said.

"High Tide in Dorchester" will be showing at the Dorchester County Historical Society. Harp says there will be more viewings of the film in the following months.

 

 

 

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