Woman Who Lost Husband, Son in 2007 Bay Bridge Accident Speaks Out - WBOC-TV 16, Delmarvas News Leader, FOX 21 -

Reported by Kevin Leahy

Woman Who Lost Husband, Son in 2007 Bay Bridge Accident Speaks Out

The May 2007 crash on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge killed three people, including Missy Orff's husband and son. (Photo: WBOC) The May 2007 crash on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge killed three people, including Missy Orff's husband and son. (Photo: WBOC)
Missy Orff (Photo: WBOC) Missy Orff (Photo: WBOC)
Portrait of Missy Orff's deceased son Jonathan and husband Randy. Portrait of Missy Orff's deceased son Jonathan and husband Randy.

08/12/2008 10:47 PM ET

CRUMPTON, Md.- Sunday morning's Chesapeake Bay Bridge accident that killed a Mountaire Farms tractor-trailer driver hit close to home for one woman. In May 2007, Missy Orff lost her husband Randy, and 19-year old son Jonathan, in a similar accident on the bridge. While traffic was headed in both directions on one span, a car's trailer came unhitched.  The resulting accident killed Randy and Jonathan, as well as James Ingle of Preston, Md.

"Believe it or not my heart stopped to hear that another family was going through what I went through," Orff said.

Last year's crash on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge killed not only Orff's husband and son, but a third victim is well. The accident occurred while traffic was traveling both ways on a single span of the bridge. And upon learning about last Sunday's fatal crash, Orff said, "Believe it or not my heart stopped to hear that another family was going through what I went through."

As a result of these tragedies, Orff is pressing for improvements on the Bay Bridge.

"I think it's about time the two-way traffic stopped," Orff said.

She has already convinced Maryland lawmakers to change one law because of her family's tragedy. She testified in favor of legislation that put stricter regulations on trailer hitches. She said addressing the issue of two-way traffic on the bridge is her next target.

When asked if she was doing this for their legacy, she said her goal is "to save other people's lives. I've only been across that bridge once and that was to get to the house of delegates, and I was scared to death that i was going to get stuck in two-way traffic."

It is a fight inside her that is not going away. 

"It might take three years, but I'm not going to stop until the day I die," Orff said.  "Because there's not going to be another bridge built anytime soon. And if anything, it will take more than 10 years, so how many more people need to die on the bridge?"

Orff said for as many obstacles as she may encounter while trying to influence legislation, she feels she is up to that challenge.

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